DIY: Zebra Drop Cloth Rug

These days the internet is overflowing with DIY (Do-It-Yourself) projects.  With so many options and variations out there, picking a project that seems not only fun – but also possible to complete – can be daunting.  We decided to take the guess work out of this equation by tackling one DIY project at least once a month.  We want to show that we can handle these projects and YOU CAN too! Our marketing assistant, Lauren Thomas, tackled our first DIY project – a Zebra Drop Cloth Rug!

DIY Header

I recently embarked on a rather crazy DIY project – a stylish metallic gold zebra print rug! This project was inspired by the growing trendiness of animal prints, not only in the interior design world, but in all facets of fashion as well!

This was such a fun DIY-er and I enjoyed it so much I wanted to share my step-by-step guide and tips and tricks to crafting your very own!

Material Collage

I first began by laying out my drop cloth on a large even surface where it was easy for me to begin sketching the outline of my zebra.

At first, I was a little nervous that the shape would not be perfectly symmetrical, but realized that the less perfectly sketched it was, the more real and authentic the shape would look-so I just went with it!

1- Sketched

I began sketching with a pencil in case I needed to erase. After I sketched the shape I wanted, I went over the lines with a sharpie, so that I could see the lines more clearly as I was cutting. I then cut the drop cloth with scissors and encouraged the edges to fray a bit, in an effort to make the rug look like an authentic hide.

2- Cut

After I was pleased with the shape, I ironed the drop cloth. Ironing makes the material smoother and eases the process of sketching and painting the stripes.

Then the painting began! I laid out a tarp that covered the surface area of the rug and began to apply the white base paint. The white paint serves not only as the background but also as a primer for the drop cloth. I used more than one quart of paint, as drop cloths absorb a TON of paint.  I recommended getting at least two quarts of paint so you can apply generously!

3- Prime

It took about three hours for the paint to dry. During this time I began sketching my stripes with a pencil.  Just remember- no two zebras have the same stripes, so just have fun with it! You really can create any look you want!

4 - Sketch

Once I was happy with the stripes I sketched, I began painting the stripes. This was my favorite step, as I loved seeing the whole process come to life! I actually mixed a tannish brown paint with a gold metallic to get a more subdued gold look.

6 - Stripes

I loved how this technique turned out because none of the stripes are the same exact color, as some were mixed with more gold and vice versa. It gives the rug a more authentic feel!

7 - Stripes 2

If you are happy with your rug with just one coat, then that is great! I chose to go back over the stripes with a second coat to add a bit more color and touch up a few light areas. Once your paint has dried completely (I would let it dry over night just to be sure) you can apply your polyurethane coat.

Stripe Detail

I applied a light coat of polyurethane in hopes that it would increase the durability of the rug. But if you find that it slightly alters the shine or hue of the finish you wanted to achieve, then you should be fine without it as long your rug will not be in a high traffic area of your home.

FINAL

Voila!  Not too difficult at all! I ended up putting the rug in my room and layered it on top of the rug I already have in the space.

Lauren Signature

 

Lauren Thomas, Marketing Assistant

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